The desturctors essay

Part 1 The story begins by introducing us to the Wormsley Common Gang, a group of boys ranging from nine to fifteen years of age, who live in a tough area of London and spend their summer holiday pulling pranks. They gather daily in an empty lot created when bombs dropped on England during World War 2 destroyed the houses that used to stand there.

The desturctors essay

Part 2 Themes and Colors Key LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Destructors, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

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Class and a Changing World Codes of Behavior Money and the Value of Things Adolescence, Age, and Rebellion Summary Analysis The story begins on the eve of a three-day weekend, when the newest member of a group of tough young boys who call themselves the Wormsley Common Gang becomes its leader.

Mike, who is nine and constantly struggles to conceal how many things he finds surprising, is the only one who finds this change surprising.

The Destructors Summary from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

The boys disdain the upper class, but see qualities in the The desturctors essay T. Their code of behavior is meritocratic and values toughness, which T. Active Themes Related Quotes with Explanations The boys gather daily in a parking lot created when bombs destroyed many of the houses that used to stand in the space.

Their leader up until the events narrated in the story is a boy named Blackie, who claims to have heard the sound of destruction when the bombs fall even though he would have been too young to remember it. On the edge of the lot, one house that survived the war still stands, although it was damaged and is propped up by wooden struts.

The setting of the story is a public space that was created through the destruction of private spaces houses by bombs dropped during the war.

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This shows that destruction can create new physical realities and in doing so set the stage for a more equal society. Blackie suspects that T. This house is owned by Mr. On one occasion, Old Misery looks over the wall at the boys as they play.

Thomas comes from the pre-war world of rigid class distinctions. He would rather hoard his money than fix his plumbing, because he values his home and money more for what they represent as a material possession suggestive of class status than for their functionality.

Looking at the boys, he reminisces about his own youth. Active Themes Another day Old Misery sees three of the boys on the common and gives them some chocolates, although he remarks that there may not be enough for all of them.

The boys are puzzled by this gesture and a boy named Summers suggests that Old Misery is trying to bribe them, so the boys decide to bounce balls off his house to annoy him.

The Destructors Part 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

Old Misery sees giving the boys chocolates as an act of kindness towards a group of poor boys, while the boys assume this gift has ulterior motives.

Active Themes The next day T. They have decided to split into pairs and see who can sneak past the most bus drivers to steal free rides. Blackie wants to understand T. In this context, Blackie dislikes the idea that T. Blackie raises objections to this plan, saying that they could be sent to prison, but T.

Eventually, the gang puts T. This is partially because they are adolescents acting out against the world as they find it. They are all well-aware of the consequences of stealing, and look down upon it as a dishonorable act that subscribes too heavily to belief in the value of things.

Active Themes Blackie walks away to ruminate on this sudden turn of events: At first he considers abandoning the gang entirely, hoping that they will learn that T.

Although he is shocked and jealous at T.

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Blackie promises to borrow a sledgehammer from the storage space of some construction workers, while Mike is told to come after he gets out of church and whistle to be let in. Once each boy has his assignment, they disperse, promising to meet the next day.

The desturctors essay

The boys organize to get the task done, showing that this act of destruction will forge new social bonds within the group. The sledgehammer, which is usually used by construction workers building a house but that Blackie will take to destroy one, also links the processes of creation and destruction.

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